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Association Between Social Media Use and Vaping Among Florida Adolescents, 2019

With the growing popularity of vaping, evidence has emerged about the association between social media use and vaping among adolescents, possibly because of the proliferation of e-cigarette advertisements and other related content on social media. Our study examined the association between social media use and vaping among adolescents. Using data from the 2019 Florida Youth Tobacco Survey (N = 10,776), we conducted logistic regression models on adolescent vaping status (experimental and current vaping) by nondaily and daily use of social media platforms – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat, controlling for other confounders. Use of all 4 selected social media platforms was significantly associated with vaping status (P <.001 for all). Once jointly analyzed, daily use of Instagram was significantly associated with increased relative risks of experimental (adjusted relative risk ratio [aRRR] = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.38-2.25) and current vaping (aRRR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16-1.95); nondaily use of Snapchat was significantly associated with increased relative risk of experimental (aRRR = 1.57; 95% CI, 1.17-2.10) and current vaping (aRRR = 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.66); daily use of Snapchat was associated with increased relative risk of experimental (aRRR = 2.38; 95% CI, 1.85-3.08) and current vaping (aRRR = 5.09; 95% CI, 3.78-6.86); nondaily use of Facebook was associated with increased relative risk of current vaping (aRRR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.00-1.43), and nondaily use of Twitter was associated with increased relative risk of current vaping (aRRR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.07-1.56). Multilevel efforts are warranted to monitor social media use and vaping status among adolescents, including media use monitoring plans, developing counter-marketing campaigns, and strict regulatory action on social media.

Authors: Lee, Juhan; Tan, Andy S L; Porter, Lauren; Young-Wolff, Kelly C; Carter-Harris, Lisa; Salloum, Ramzi G

Prev Chronic Dis. 2021 05 13;18:E49. Epub 2021-05-13.

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